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‘It’s a matter of your personality more than anything else’: The experiences of seasonal workers regarding challenging behaviour in children

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journal contribution
posted on 2023-01-23, 16:56 authored by Leanne Etheridge, Hannah Senior

 The impact on full-time carers of children with intellectual disabilities who exhibit challenging behaviour has been well researched (e.g. Lach et al., 2009; Shah et al., 2010; Wodehouse and McGill, 2009), however, there is to date no published research into the impact of behaviour that challenges on seasonal carers. Five participants who had been employed in summer playschemes for children and young people (up to the age of 18) were interviewed about their experiences of behaviour that challenges. The transcripts were analysed using interpretative phenomenological analysis, which revealed six superordinate themes: the belief in and sanctuary of temporary work, emotional impact, personality and gender, strength through knowledge, communication difficulties and the belief in integration. Seasonal workers discussed suppressing their emotions in order to stay in control of a challenging situation, using coping styles developed through experience or based on personal skills; it is suggested that formalized training, particularly regarding non-verbal communication, would support playscheme workers in the management of and adaption to challenging behaviour. 

History

Published in

Journal of Intellectual Disabilities

Publisher

Sage

Version

AM (Accepted Manuscript)

Citation

Etheridge, L. and Senior, H. (2016) 'It's a matter of your personality more than anything else': The experiences of seasonal workers regarding challenging behaviour in children', Journal of Intellectual Disabilities, 21 (1), pp. 40-52

Print ISSN

1744-6295

Electronic ISSN

1744-6309

Cardiff Met Affiliation

Cardiff School of Sport and Health Sciences

Cardiff Met Authors

Leanne Freeman

Cardiff Met Research Centre/Group

  • Applied Psychology and Behaviour Change

Copyright Holder

© The Publisher

Language

en