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The Impact of Working with Farm Animals on People with Offending Histories: A Scoping Review

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journal contribution
posted on 13.06.2022, 12:37 authored by Libby PayneLibby Payne, Mary McMurran, Clare Glennan, Jenny Mercer

 Within  the  Criminal  Justice  System,  using  animals  for  therapeutic  or  rehabilitative  purposes  has  garnered  momentum  and  is  extensively  researched.  By  contrast,  the  evidence  concerning  the  impact  of  farm  animal  work,  either  on  prison  farms  or  social  farms  for  community  sanctions,  is  less  well  understood.  This  review  sought  to  explore  the  evidence  that  exists  in  relation  to  four  areas:  (1)  farm  animals  and  their contribution to rehabilitation from offending; (2) any indicated mechanisms of change; (3) the development of a human—food/production animal bond, and (4) the experiences  of  forensic  service  users  working  with  dairy  cattle.  Fourteen  articles  were included in the review. Good quality research on the impact of working with farm  animals  and  specifically  dairy  cattle,  with  adult  offenders,  was  very  limited.  However,  some  studies  suggested  that  the  rehabilitative  potential  of  farm  animals  with offenders should not be summarily dismissed but researched further to firmly establish impact. 

History

Published in

International Journal of Offender Therapy and Comparative Criminology

Publisher

Sage

Version

VoR (Version of Record)

Citation

Payne, L., McMurran, M., Glennan, C. and Mercer, J. (2022) 'The Impact of Working with Farm Animals on People with Offending Histories: A Scoping Review', International Journal of Offender Therapy and Comparative Criminology. DOI: 10.1177/0306624X221102851

Print ISSN

0306-624X

Electronic ISSN

1552-6933

Cardiff Met Affiliation

Cardiff School of Sport and Health Sciences

Cardiff Met Authors

Libby Payne Clare Glennan Jenny Mercer

Cardiff Met Research Centre/Group

  • Public Health and Wellbeing
  • Applied Psychology and Behaviour Change

Copyright Holder

© The Authors

Language

en