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Taking sporting autobiographies seriously as an analytical and pedagogical resource in sport, exercise and health

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journal contribution
posted on 06.05.2022, 14:48 by Andrew C. Sparkes, Carly Stewart

 This article makes the case for taking sporting autobiographies seriously as both an analytical and pedagogical resource. First, the nature of autobiography is clarified and the interest shown by other disciplines in this genre is discussed. Next, the prevailing negative view of sporting autobiographies and the assumptions underlying them are outlined. These are then countered by the presentation of a more positive view that challenges a number of alleged ‘problems’ associated with sporting autobiographies that include being tainted by commercial commitments, the presence of the ghostwriter, and not being able to guarantee unmediated authenticity and ‘truth’. Various forms of narrative analysis (thematic, structural, performative/dialogical) are then described and examples of each of these being applied to sporting autobiographies are provided. Finally, attention is given to the use of sporting autobiographies as a pedagogical resource and the ways in which they might be productively used with students are discussed. 

History

Published in

Qualitative Research in Sport, Exercise and Health

Publisher

Taylor & Francis

Version

AM (Accepted Manuscript)

Citation

Sparkes, A.C. and Stewart, C. (2016) 'Taking sporting autobiographies seriously as an analytical and pedagogical resource in sport, exercise and health', Qualitative Research in Sport, Exercise and Health, 8(2), pp.113-130. DOI: 10.1080/2159676X.2015.1121915

Print ISSN

2159-6778

Cardiff Met Affiliation

  • Cardiff School of Sport and Health Sciences

Cardiff Met Research Centre/Group

  • Qualitative Research Methods and Social Theory

Copyright Holder

© The Publisher

Language

en