Psaila Ranson 2016 Injury Risk Factors Armed Forces PTiS.pdf (426.66 kB)
Download file

Risk factors for lower leg, ankle and foot injuries during basic military training in the Maltese Armed Forces

Download (426.66 kB)
journal contribution
posted on 03.05.2022, 16:02 authored by Matthew Psaila, Craig Ranson

 Objectives - Basic military training is physically and psychologically demanding placing recruits at high risk of injury and premature discharge. This study aimed to identify risk factors for lower leg, ankle and foot injury in Maltese military recruits during basic training. Design - This was a prospective cohort study. Setting - An armed forces barracks. Participants - 127 recruits commencing one basic military training course agreed to participate in the study. The cohort comprised 114 males and 13 females with a mean age of 21.7 ± 2.4 years. Main outcome measures - All injuries to the lower leg, ankle and foot were recorded using the Orchard Sports Injury Classification System. Injuries were analysed for associations with fitness scores, smoking status, body mass index and foot type. Results - A total of 34 (26.2%) recruits sustained at least one injury, with 10 recruits (7.9%) terminating their training prematurely (three due to musculoskeletal injury). Smoking history, body mass index and foot type were not associated with injury risk. Lower fitness levels at the commencement of basic military training compared with fitness levels measured six months prior, were associated with higher injury risk. Conclusions - Lower fitness at the commencement of basic training was associated with higher injury risk in army recruits. Thus, conditioning programmes aimed at improving recruit fitness should be considered within an injury prevention strategy. 

History

Published in

Physical Therapy in Sport

Publisher

Elsevier

Version

AM (Accepted Manuscript)

Citation

Psaila, M and Ranson, C. (2017) 'Risk factors for lower leg, ankle and foot injuries during basic military training in the Maltese Armed Forces', Physical Therapy in Sport, 24, pp.7-12

Print ISSN

1466-853X

Cardiff Met Affiliation

  • Cardiff School of Sport and Health Sciences

Cardiff Met Research Centre/Group

  • Applied Injury Science

Copyright Holder

© The Publisher

Language

en