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Non-state nations: Structure, rescaling, and the role of territorial policy communities, illustrated by the cases of Wales and Sardinia

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journal contribution
posted on 15.02.2022, 16:32 by Nick CliftonNick Clifton, Alessia Usai
This paper explores the role of non-state nations’ identity and agency with regard to relations with their host nation states. The particular focus here is on the means by which such regions might express their individuality. To this end, we employ a comparative case study analysis of two non-state nations with a range of differing yet in other ways similar qualities – namely Wales (UK) and Sardinia (Italy). We suggest that this is a valuable exercise, allowing as it does for the exploring of evidence ‘on the ground’ of the processes involved. The conceptual rationale for the paper is provided by new regionalism – regions as actors beyond the nation state. Following this, the idea of the ‘territorial policy community’ is presented as a point of departure, with the scope of the paper being to develop a diachronic framework for regional change. Given the focus on identity and interest articulation, the role of regional political parties is a particular subject of the empirical investigation, with non-state nations and nation states linked by opportunistic relationships based on political and electoral support. We then consider what this might mean with regard to the capacity of non-state nations to build on the past to successfully negotiate future policy-making agendas. Finally, we reflect on the limitations of the study, and consider the implications of its findings for further research agendas.

History

Published in

Environment and Planning C: Politics and Space

Publisher

Sage

Version

AM (Accepted Manuscript)

Citation

Clifton, N. and Usai, A. (2018) 'Non-state nations: Structure, rescaling, and the role of territorial policy communities, illustrated by the cases of Wales and Sardinia', Environment and Planning C: Politics and Space, p.2399654418815695

Print ISSN

2399-6544

Electronic ISSN

2399-6552

Cardiff Met Affiliation

  • Cardiff School of Management

Cardiff Met Authors

Nick Clifton

Cardiff Met Research Centre/Group

  • Welsh Centre for Business and Management Research

Copyright Holder

© The Publisher

Language

en