Housing and justice in Wales.pdf (165.15 kB)
Download file

Housing and justice in Wales

Download (165.15 kB)
journal contribution
posted on 28.01.2022, 16:19 authored by Sarah Nason, Helen TaylorHelen Taylor
The Commission on Justice in Wales concluded that Welsh people are being let down by the England and Wales justicesystem.1 It found that the "jagged edged"2 reservation of courts, probation, prisons, etc alongside devolution of social justice responsibilities does not meet people’s needs in Wales. The Commission recommended legislative and executive devolution of responsibility for justice, accompanied by the transfer of financial resources.3 It also recommended that the law applicable in Wales should be formally identified as the law of Wales, distinct from the law of England.4Alongside the Justice Commission, our Nuffield Foundation funded research focused on administrative justice in Wales, including studying administrative law and dispute resolution in social housing and homelessness.5 Administrative justice concerns how bodies providing public services treat people, the correctness of their decisions, the fairness of their procedures and the opportunities people have to question and challenge decisions made about them. Here we present some conclusions and recommendations of our research concerning housing, and how these align with those of the Justice Commission.

History

Published in

Journal of Housing Law

Publisher

Sweet & Maxwell

Publication Year

2020

Version

AM (Accepted Manuscript)

Citation

Nason, S. & Taylor, H. (2020) 'Housing and justice in Wales', Journal of Housing Law 23 (5) pp. 97-103

Print ISSN

1368-6542

Cardiff Met Affiliation

  • Cardiff School of Education and Social Policy

Copyright Holder

© The Publisher

Language

en