Creativity, Cohesion and the Post-conflict Society - Clifton N and Macaulay T.pdf (767.84 kB)
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Creativity, cohesion and the ‘post-conflict’ society: A policy agenda (Illustrated from the case of Northern Ireland)

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journal contribution
posted on 28.02.2022, 17:11 authored by Nick CliftonNick Clifton, Tony Macaulay
The intertwining of economic crises and political violence has been an ongoing narrative for Northern Ireland over the past four decades. However, with the end of ‘The Troubles’ and the transition to what has been termed a ‘post-conflict’ society (i.e. one in which the violence has largely ceased but its legacy remains), what is an appropriate agenda for economic development? To this end, we consider the current context in Northern Ireland in terms of cohesion, diversity and inclusion, and the implications therein of present policies. The geography of creative individuals within Northern Ireland is reviewed, and found to be particularly polarized within Belfast. That the highest areas of present deprivation are typically found in those most affected by past conflict suggests failures of policy since the ‘Good Friday’ Agreement of 1998. If economic growth, tolerance and diversity are linked, then all stakeholders must address these issues. Northern Ireland should neither be seen as a ‘normal’ lagging region nor one into which a standard neo-liberal development agenda can be transplanted free of context. At present, social cohesion appears to be regarded as an outcome of economic prosperity rather than as a factor that might actually drive it.

History

Published in

European Planning Studies

Publisher

Taylor & Francis

Version

AM (Accepted Manuscript)

Citation

Clifton, N. and Macaulay, T. (2015) 'Creativity, cohesion and the ‘post-conflict’ society: A policy agenda (Illustrated from the case of Northern Ireland)', European Planning Studies, 23 (12), pp. 2370-2389

Print ISSN

0965-4313

Electronic ISSN

1469-5944

Cardiff Met Affiliation

  • Cardiff School of Management

Cardiff Met Authors

Nick Clifton

Cardiff Met Research Centre/Group

  • Welsh Centre for Business and Management Research

Copyright Holder

© The Publisher

Language

en