Cognitive behaviour therapy for bulimia nervosa and eating disorders not otherwise specified -Translation from randomized c.pdf (706.33 kB)
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Cognitive behaviour therapy for bulimia nervosa and eating disorders not otherwise specified: Translation from randomized controlled trial to a clinical setting

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journal contribution
posted on 08.04.2022, 15:24 authored by Sarah Knott, Debbie Woodward, Antonia Hoefkens, Caroline Limbert

 Background: Enhanced Cognitive Behaviour Therapy (CBT-E) (Fairburn, Cooper and Shafran, 2003) was developed as a treatment approach for eating disorders focusing on both core psychopathology and additional maintenance mechanisms. Aims: To evaluate treatment outcomes associated with CBT-E in a NHS Eating Disorders Service for adults with bulimia and atypical eating disorders and to make comparisons with a previously published randomized controlled trial (Fairburn et al., 2009) and “real world” evaluation (Byrne, Fursland, Allen and Watson, 2011). Method: Participants were referred to the eating disorder service between 2002 and 2011. They were aged between 18–65 years, registered with a General Practitioner within the catchment area, and had experienced symptoms fulfilling criteria for BN or EDNOS for a minimum of 6 months. Results: CBT-E was commenced by 272 patients, with 135 completing treatment. Overall, treatment was associated with significant improvements in eating disorder and associated psychopathology, for both treatment completers and the intention to treat sample. Conclusions: Findings support dissemination of CBT-E in this context, with significant improvements in eating disorder psychopathology. Improvements to global EDE-Q scores were higher for treatment completers and lower for the intention to treat sample, compared to previous studies (Fairburn et al., 2009; Byrne et al., 2011). Level of attrition was found at 40.8% and non-completion of treatment was associated with higher levels of anxiety. Potential explanations for these findings are discussed. 

History

Published in

Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapy

Publisher

Cambridge University Press

Version

AM (Accepted Manuscript)

Citation

Knott, S., Woodward, D., Hoefkens, A. and Limbert, C. (2015) 'Cognitive behaviour therapy for Bulimia Nervosa and eating disorders not otherwise specified: translation from randomized controlled trial to a clinical setting', Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapy, 43, pp 641-654

Print ISSN

1352-4658

Cardiff Met Affiliation

Cardiff School of Sport and Health Sciences

Cardiff Met Authors

Caroline Limbert

Cardiff Met Research Centre/Group

  • Applied Psychology and Behaviour Change

Copyright Holder

© The Publisher

Language

en