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Chrononutrition—When we eat is of the essence in tackling obesity

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posted on 2022-11-29, 14:58 authored by Maninder Ahluwalia

 Obesity is a chronic and relapsing public health problem with an extensive list of associatedcomorbidities.  The worldwide prevalence of obesity has nearly tripled over the last five decadesand continues to pose a serious threat to wider society and the wellbeing of future generations. Thepathogenesis of obesity is complex but diet plays a key role in the onset and progression of the disease.The human diet has changed drastically across the globe, with an estimate that approximately 72%of the calories consumed today come from foods that were not part of our ancestral diets and arenot compatible with our metabolism. Additionally, multiple nutrient-independent factors, e.g., cost,accessibility, behaviours, culture, education, work commitments, knowledge and societal set-up,influence our food choices and eating patterns. Much research has been focused on ‘what to eat’ or‘how much to eat’ to reduce the obesity burden, but increasingly evidence indicates that ‘when toeat’ is fundamental to human metabolism. Aligning feeding patterns to the 24-h circadian clock thatregulates a wide range of physiological and behavioural processes has multiple health-promotingeffects with anti-obesity being a major part. This article explores the current understanding of theinteractions between the body clocks, bioactive dietary components and the less appreciated role ofmeal timings in energy homeostasis and obesity. 

History

Published in

Nutrients

Publisher

MDPI

Version

  • VoR (Version of Record)

Citation

Ahluwalia, M.K. (2022) 'Chrononutrition—When We Eat Is of the Essence in Tackling Obesity',Nutrients,14, 5080. https://doi.org/10.3390/nu14235080

Electronic ISSN

2072-6643

Cardiff Met Affiliation

  • Cardiff School of Sport and Health Sciences

Cardiff Met Authors

Maninder Ahluwalia

Cardiff Met Research Centre/Group

  • Nutrition Food & Health

Copyright Holder

  • © The Authors

Language

  • en

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