Cardiff Metropolitan University
Browse

File(s) not publicly available

Can education influence the public’s vulnerability to county lines? 

journal contribution
posted on 2024-02-02, 15:34 authored by Chloe-Marie Hayman, Daniel Stubbings, Joseph Lloyd Davies, Libby PayneLibby Payne

This paper explored the novel use of an educational tool to assess its influence on County Lines victimisation. Participants (n = 122) were randomly assigned to receive either County Lines education or no County Lines education and then rate their likelihood to engage in five hypothetical scenarios typical of County Lines victimisation verses a text scam. County Lines education did not significantly reduce participant willingness to engage in the scenarios, whilst most participants were not susceptible to a text scam. Demographic data, drug use, social isolation, poor mental health, and financial instability were weak predictors of engagement. Findings suggest that the public may be vulnerable to victimisation and that future research should continue to explore the role that education can have in reducing the likelihood of engaging in County Lines activity.

History

Published in

Crime Prevention and Community Safety

Publisher

Palgrave Macmillan

Version

  • VoR (Version of Record)

Citation

Hayman, C. M., Stubbings, D. R., Davies, J. L., & Payne, L. (2024) 'Can education influence the public’s vulnerability to county lines?', Crime Prevention and Community Safety, 1-19. https://doi.org/10.1057/s41300-023-00195-z

Print ISSN

1460-3780

Electronic ISSN

1743-4629

Cardiff Met Affiliation

  • Cardiff School of Sport and Health Sciences

Cardiff Met Authors

Daniel Stubbings Joseph Lloyd Davies Libby Payne

Cardiff Met Research Centre/Group

  • Applied Psychology and Behaviour Change

Copyright Holder

  • © The Publisher

Language

  • en

Usage metrics

    Population Risk & Healthcare - Journal Articles

    Categories

    Licence

    Exports

    RefWorks
    BibTeX
    Ref. manager
    Endnote
    DataCite
    NLM
    DC